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Ocean Surveys NZ ltd
                                                         
WE CAN OFFER OPTIONS USING THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY & TRADITIONAL METHODS OF MARINE SURVEYING 

FULL SURVEYS:

Will include the listed items unless specifically excluded.


INSURANCE INSPECTIONS:

These are designed to give a general overview of the vessels condition with suitability for insurance in mind. They are not sufficiently detailed for pre-purchase decision making.

They cover areas such as Hull under-water, Hull above water, Rudder, Shaft, Prop, Skin fittings, Boarding platforms, Hull/ Deck join, Bollards/Cleats, Rails, Windlass, Cockpit area, Cabin, Windows/Hatches, Mast/Rig, Bilge/ Seacocks, Hoses and clips, Shaft and Rudder seals, Bilge pumps, Safety equipment, Gas installation, Mechanical installations. All this in a general sense so that the underwriter can get a sense of whether the vessel is a good risk.

Some insurers have their own forms others prefer a written report. These inspections do require the vessel to be hauled out. A substantial amount of the inspection can be achieved while afloat but under-water hull inspection, shaft, rudder, propeller etc. need to be inspected ashore. Insurers seem to prefer a survey every 5 years, so why not organise an inspection for next haul out?  


OTHER SURVEYS/INSPECTIONS:

Can be arranged as required such as Hull Only which will include the hull inside and out and since all skin fittings, the rudder and stern gear pierce the hull, will include these items.

For Trailer boats specific areas can be looked at, for high powered vessels a careful scrutiny of just the hull may be the service required?




Yachts

All means will be utilised as appropriate to determine the

structural integrity of the vessel including such things as,

moisture meter, Ultra Sonic Thickness Gauge and more

traditional methods used by marine surveyors.

Mechanical installations will only be commented on from

a visual inspection as will the electrical installation. The

rig will only be inspected from the deck.

 

  • Bilge Pumps.

  • Cathodic protection.

  • Davits.

  • Boarding ladders and accesses.

  • Decks and deck equipment.

  • Electrical installations.

  • Equipment levels.

  • Fastenings.

  • Fire equipment.

  • Fresh water installations.

  • Fuel tanks and pipework.

  • Gas systems.

  • Ground tackle.

  • Guard and handrails.

  • Hatches and openings.

  • Hull bottom coating.

  • Keel.

  • Machinery.

  • Mast, rigging and sails.

  • Plumbing, includes refrigeration.

  • Rudders and hangings.

  • Safety equipment.

  • Shafts and couplings.

  • Skin fittings and sea cocks.

  • Steering gear.

  • Stern gear.

  • Stern glands.

  • Superstructure.

  • Toilet installations.

  • Ventilation systems.

  • Windows and portlights.


Launches

All means will be utilised as appropriate to determine the structural

integrity of the vessel including such things as, moisture meter, Ultra Sonic

Thickness Gauge and more traditional methods used by marine surveyors.

Mechanical installations will only be commented on from a visual

inspection as will the electrical installation.

  • Bilge Pumps.

  • Cathodic protection.

  • Davits.

  • Boarding ladders and accesses.

  • Decks and deck equipment.

  • Electrical installations.

  • Equipment levels.

  • Fastenings.

  • Fire equipment.

  • Fresh water installations.

  • Fuel tanks and pipework.

  • Gas systems.

  • Ground tackle.

  • Guard and handrails.

  • Hatches and openings.

  • Hull bottom coating.

  • Machinery.

  • Plumbing, includes refrigeration.

  • Rudders and hangings.

  • Safety equipment.

  • Shafts and couplings.

  • Skin fittings and sea cocks.

  • Steering gear.

  • Stern gear.

  • Stern glands.

  • Superstructure.

  • Toilet installations.

  • Ventilation systems.

  • Windows and portlights.










Trailer Boats

These require a particular eye for detail and given the

size, complexity and cost of present day trailer boats a

pre-purchase survey would be a wise decision. They are

subject to enormous stresses and a clear understanding

of the vessels state at time of purchase would be

invaluable. As above for methods employed to determine

structural integrity.

 

  • Bilge Pumps.

  • Boarding ladders and accesses.

  • Decks and deck equipment.

  • Electrical installations.

  • Equipment levels.

  • Fire equipment.

  • Fresh water installations.

  • Fuel tanks and pipework.

  • Gas systems.

  • Ground tackle.

  • Guard and handrails.

  • Hatches and openings.

  • Keel.

  • Machinery.

  • Mast, rigging and sails.

  • Plumbing, includes refrigeration.

  • Rudders and hangings.

  • Safety equipment.

  • Shafts and couplings.

  • Skin fittings and sea cocks.

  • Steering gear.

  • Stern gear.

  • Stern glands.

  • Superstructure.

  • Toilet installations.

  • Ventilation systems.

  • Windows and portlights.